Sarah Chang returns to London


The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra’s 2010-2011 season at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall sees Maestro Charles Dutoit return for his second season as Artistic Director and Principal Conductor of the Orchestra, taking the baton for three electrifying concerts. These concerts feature Maestro Dutoit’s renowned passion for the Russian repertoire, with performances of the complete scores of Stravinsky’s three great ballets Petrushka, The Firebird and The Rite of Spring, alongside three great Romantic concertos.
The series features a veritable feast of orchestral masterpieces from Respighi’s highly programmatic works to concertos by Bruch and Mendelssohn and an all-Beethoven programme directed by the legendary Pinchas Zukerman. The Orchestra welcomes some of the world’s finest conductors and soloists including Mischa Maisky, Sarah Chang, Andrew Litton and the legendary Martha Argerich.


Ottorino Respighi:
Fountains of Rome

Max Bruch: Violin Concerto No.1 in G minor
Interval
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.4
Kirill Karabits conductor
Sarah Chang violin

Date: 24 Apr 2011
Venue: Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX
Prices: £42 £35 £28 £22 £17 £12 £9 Premium seats £55
Booking Fee: £1.75 (Members £0.00)
Concessions: 50% off (limited availability)

 

Respighi is renowned for his superb orchestrations (as befits a student of Rimsky-Korsakov) – both of other composers’ music and in original works such as the captivating The Fountains of Rome.
Although he composed several choral and orchestral works (including three concertos for the violin and one for two pianos), Bruch’s fame today rests largely on one phenomenally successful piece – the Violin Concerto in G minor. Richly melodic and sumptuously orchestrated, this enchanting concerto is beloved of performers and audiences alike.
Although it is tempting to relate Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony to the suicidal despair caused by his disastrous marriage, he had in fact sketched the first three movements before meeting his future wife. In any event, he later maintained that the symphony was an ‘echo’ of the events in his life, in which the sinister fanfares of Fate are ultimately swept away by an indomitable reaffirmation of life.

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