Home » Archives by category » Romeo (Page 3)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 169)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 169)

Embedded in this passage is the idea that the Confucian way of self-cultivation results from the cultivation of sincerity. Speaking more in the light of the Doctrine of the Mean, Chou Tun-i said: “Sincerity is the foundation of the sage.” He talked about both metaphysical and ethical aspects of the idea of sincerity. Sincerity is […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 168)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 168)

Sagehood and Learning Sincerity (Songhak) According to Yulgok, one can neither nourish one’s ki nor harmonise one’s feelings and emotions, unless one cultivates sincerity (song). In the Songhak chipyo he argues that sincerity is the basis for the Neo-Confucian learning of sagehood (songhak). Sincerity is viewed by him as the fundamental virtue for nourishing ki, […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 167)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 167)

According to Yulgok, the concrete prerequisite is to “make the resolve” (ipchi) before the practice of nourishing ki and of harmonising feelings. A key passage from his “Sugi” (Self-Cultivation) elucidates it as follows: “Nothing is prior than to make the resolve. If one’s resolve is not established first, one cannot achieve one’s learning completed. Thus, […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 166)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 166)

Embedded in Yulgok’s argument is that all human feelings and desires are basically cognitive because they are aroused as the consciousness of our mind responds to external stimuli. His notion of emotion is somewhat similar to modern cognitive theories of emotion, according to which emotions are either wholly or partially cognition or dependent on consciousness. […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 165)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 165)

According to Yulgok’s Four-Seven thesis, the “original human nature” refers to its unmanifested state without evil; when it is manifest in feelings, it can have either good or evil. All human beings respect moral principles such as benevolence, righteousness, and so on; these kinds of feelings refer to the innate feelings of virtuous behaviour. And […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 164)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 164)

Self-Cultivation and Emotional Integration In his Four-Seven thesis, Yulgok minted that if one knows and nourishes the functioning of one’s ki, then one’s mind will follow moral principles. Otherwise, self-cultivation is very difficult because one’s feelings and desires attain their selfishness, as the mind becomes precarious. In the context of Yulgok’s theory of the nourishment […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 163)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 163)

To accomplish the learning of sagehood, the method of self-cultivation, then, requires one to nourish ki. And everyone is capable of accomplishing it because each person is originally born with “upright” and “penetrating” ki. In his Four-Seven debate with Ugye, Yulgok makes an interesting statement about the task of self-cultivation: Heaven and Earth received what […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 162)

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi Toegye and Yi Yulgok (Part 162)

As we have seen in his Four-Seven thesis, Yulgok emphasised the physical and empirical reality of ki, while utilising Lo’s philosophy. The role of ki plays a vital current in Yulgok’s theory and practice of self-cultivation. His understanding of good and evil is closely associated with his interpretation. The question is, Why does human nature […]

London United Korean Fan Club

London United Japanese Fan Club